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Michael Hayden

Porte Cochere de la Lumiere

1990

Porte Cochère de la Lumière (The Portal of Light) is the artist’s interpretation of the freestanding structures that once lit the way into buildings for travellers descending from their carriages.

Installed in 1989, it is 55 feet tall and 32 feet in diameter, and made of mirror-polished stainless steel, and acrylic and multiple laminates of “diffraction grating” with UV inhibitors and protection.

The piece is holographically originated and, as sunlight hits the various angles, a rainbow effect is created. These rainbows are projected onto and into the building.


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Laszlo Szilvassy

Flames

1990

The artist visited Calgary and Alberta several times before he was awarded the commission for an outdoor sculpture at the BP Centre.  When describing his sculpture, Szilvassy commented, “Each time I was there (in Calgary), I felt an upward surge of energy, a burning enthusiasm, the old joie de vivre, a certain ‘lightness’ as opposed to the clumsy dullness of Toronto.  So, I am paying homage to this lightness and enthusiasm with my shimmering sculpture.”

Flames is constructed of stainless steel, with each flame cut from two separate sheets of metal, then formed, shaped and welded. It is 3 metres high and weighs approximately .5 tonnes.